Workaid is always delighted to receive feedback from projects we have worked with. We decided to share Millicent’s story of how Workaid has affected her life.

Millicent is the daughter of peasant farmers in rural Transnzoia. Her parents couldn’t afford to send her to secondary school so instead she started work. Having moved to Nairobi, Millicent got a job as house-help earning as little as KSHS 3,000 per month (£22 approx.). She lived off KSHS 1,000 and was able to send KSHS 2,000 to support her parents.

After six months of this work a friend told Millicent of a course with VPM Women’s Vocational Training scheme. For a minimal fee, courses covered were dressmaking, tailoring and knitting. Leaving her house-help work behind, Millicent joined VPM in September 2016 and began her training in both tailoring, embroidery and knitting classes. Her hard work and dedication paid off, as after a year she passed her government trade test.

Reverend Franklyn Otwoma rewards students when they pass with a sewing machine and a small loan to help them get their own businesses started.

Millicent took this opportunity to set up a stall making and selling school uniforms. Now at 19 years old, income from her stall has enabled her to rent a house for herself. She continues to assist her parents and has paid off her loan. As well as this, in the future she aims to open her own shop and provide training for other vulnerable ladies like herself.

Millicent has expressed the utmost gratitude to both VPM and Workaid for empowering her, as well as the benefits that have helped her and her family.

Millicent’s testimony is a perfect example of what Workaid strives to achieve, not only has she gained a fantastic trade skill, but she has utilized this to set up her own business.

Probably most inspiring of all is her aspiration to her others, building on the sustainable change toward self-sufficiency that Workaid aims to promote.

Click here to read more about Workaid’s work with VPM or check out their website.